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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 25, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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iran's nuclear deal is causing controversy, the roadblock that threatened to end the agreement. as fighting continues in syria, civil war and a new report reveals how children are targeted by the violence. a large and deadly storm system is moving across the u.s., how it could snarl holiday travel plans. and it's the whitest major city in america and one photographer is putting the spotlight on minorities living there. ♪
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good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy, a gridlock between the u.s. and iran is broken but officials say the difficult part is still to come and they are reacting to a milestone and a deal in geneva that eliminates the nuclear program and paves the way for further steps. >> translator: it has been written clearly in the text of this agreement that iran will continue its enrichment and therefore i announce to the people of iran that enrichment will continue in the same way as before. >> reporter: praise for rihani as they celebrate on the streets and the foreign minister is ambassador for peace on his return from geneva. in the u.s. there is skepticism and shows iran that the white house is weak. >> i think you are going to see on capitol hill again a by
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partisan effort to try to make sure this is not the final agreement because people know this administration is strong on announcements and long on announcements and short on follow through. >> this is an interim deal and obama administration says it will come together with a stronger and lasting agreement with iran and we have more. >> secretary of state john kerry said the six month agreement buys time to hammer out a more comprehensive deal, one that aims to roll back the iran's nuclear program and not just halt it. >> now the hard part begins, the effort to get the comprehensive agreement which will require enormous steps in terms of verification, transparency and accountability. we know this. we will work together and start today literally to continue the efforts out of geneva and to
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press forward. >> kerry, a long-time veteran of the senate had push back from lawmakers who didn't have a seat at the table and still weighing their own legislation to increase sanctions against iran. >> i would caution the president from over selling the deal because it's not a full dismantling of the program and that would be a historic deal. when you have friends and allies inside the region strongly opposed to it i would caution it. >> reporter: john boehner says this interim deal is being met with healthy skepticism and hard questions and says both the white house and congress wants a final deal from ever creating a nuclear weapon but for now the lingering question is whether the negotiating partners will work equally hard to preserve the strong international sanction regime until that goal is achieve and they emphasize that the threat of america's military must still be in play.
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>> our policy is that iran should not have a nuclear arms capability and that continues to be our policy. and the military option as secretary kerry just said is still on the table and needs to be on the table. we need to make sure that iran moves forward and i think this is an important thing. >> the democratics put out statements sunday saying they expect the senate to move forward despite pleas from the white house with the new deal and i'm in washington. >> they were a big part of the associations in geneva and they agreed to temporarily enriching uranium 5% and agreed to give greater access to inspector including the daily access at the sites and the deal calls for
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plutonium to be halted in iran which some say could be used to make weapons and it drew criticism from benjamin natasha ghoneim and -- netanyahu and he says it's a mistake and we have more from jerusalem. >> a grim-faced prime minister addressing his cabinet and condemning the deal in the strongest of terms. >> translator: what was reached last night in geneva is not a historic agreement, it's a historic mistake and it's dangerous because the most dangerous regime in the world obtained the most dangerous weapons in the world. >> the exact opposite had been argued in geneva when the deal was reached in the morning, investing it offers peace and
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not threat. >> it will make our partners in the region safer. it will make our ally, israel, safer. >> it is important that all of us see the opportunity to end the unnecessary crisis and open new horizons based on respect for the rights of the iranian people and removal of any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of iran's nuclear program. >> they insist the deal is a first step in a process intended to build trust and a phase expected to last six months and the question of sanctions will once again be reviewed but the mood in israel, that is six months too long. mike hanna, al jazeera in west
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jerusalem. >> we will hear from a candidate who heads the iran council. a deadly storm is barreling across the country taking 8 lives already and freezing rain and heavy snow hammered the southwest and now it's heads to the east coast before millions of travelers hit the road for the holiday and we have more on the storm with erica. >> this storm is so serious it has a name, boraias, a wave of arctic cold collapsing roofs and causing car crashes like the one in new mexico that killed a four-year-old girl and bearing down on the northeast just in time for one of the busiest travel days of the year. >> icy temperatures and freezing rain and flash floods and storm, the storm is not letting up after slamming the southwest, moving to the midwest and barreling for the northeast.
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the winter conditions caused hundreds of spin outs, rollovers and pile ups and the car crashes blamed for all of the people killed in the storm's path and rescue teams found a body near downed power lines and a woman was killed when a tree fell on her parked car. in texas and oklahoma ice halted highways and caused treacherous travel. >> it's hard and you can't control your car if you go under the bridges and stuff it whips you. >> california and worsened fires over the weekend as the storm dumped heavy snow in nevada and folks in arizona feel the same way after they got hit with snow and sleet. >> we need it and it's good and we have been so dry. >> reporter: nearly four feet of snow fell on the four corn earns where colorado, utah, arizona and mexico share a
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border and not used to this at all. >> it's all white! look at this stuff. >> reporter: it was slamming away on sunday pushing through texas and nelson was not on board but three ban members were hurt and to avoid accidents on flights flowing at fort worth they spent the day deicing planes and 300 flights have been cancelled making for long lines and waiting. cold temperatures and winds have dropped wind chills in the teens in much of the northeast, a preview of what is to come this week and the storm is set to hit washington d.c. philadelphia and it's the busiest day of the year and expect 44 million people to travel this week and 90% of them
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plan to travel by car. >> of course they do. could be a real message al jazeera erica thank you. that winter storm is still on the move and nicole mitchell is tracking the system. let's check in with her to find out where it's headed, nicole. >> in texas we have seen in the northern parts up to 10" of snow. and not usual for texas and not a place where we are used to drive in all of this. let's look and as you can see you see areas of anything, dallas for example at the airport rain and areas in the suburbs it's snow so it's right on the freezing mark. as it moves along and we have the different winter weather advisories uch and warnings from texas to arkansas and slick conditions there and this slowly moves out through the day and turns more into rain as it moves through the south with warm air coming in but this is where all of this moves heading up the coastline into the day on
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wednesday impacting some of the big hubs out there on a very busy travel day, one of the busiest travel holidays as we watch all of that. by midday tuesday on ward they are some areas impacted and the areas in yellow are chances for thunderstorms through the south and then on kind of back and north side of in the blues that we are showing are areas that could see some snow mix in so if you are doing the drive instead it could be more of the slick conditions like we have already seen and a number of accidents as the storm has moving its way along. this will be very troublesome and still snow around the great lakes and also wind that could kick up as the system moves in and on the backside of that it's creating a brisk warning today and will talk more about the temperatures in a couple of minutes and back to you. >> at least 160 people are dead after two days of fighting between rebels and government forces in syria and breaking
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through a blockade near the capitol of damascus and assad are stopping food, water and medicine and say they are trying to starr residents and they will meet today with russia diplomates and try to get a peace conference. and it cannot come soon enough by those effected by the war, the fighting is taking a heavy toll on that nation's children. >> it's 1:00 on wednesday afternoon in a district of damascus. one of the local activist is asking a group of children what it's like living here. >> translator: when we were at school piles of dead bodies were brought in everyday. we used to see them being prepared for burial. and as they continue to tell their story this happened.
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[bombing sound] a shell hits the area. it's a snapshot of what it's like on the ground. while political bickering has the luxury of time many living here do not. the united nations said half of syrians are dependent on foreign aid to survive, that is 9.3 million people. 6 1/2 are displaced and over 2 million have fled syria many of them live in refugee camps in neighboring country and at least 100,000 people have been killed and then your report by the oxford research group said 11,000 of those are children. but today these children survived. al jazeera managed to track them down in the syrian capitol. >> translator: we were riding our bikes when we saw the activist and said i want to film you. when we were filming a shell landed. we didn't get hurt. my mother started crying.
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my mother also cried. >> many asked the question if political pressure paves the way for a safe visit by the chemical weapons inspectors here why can't the same be done for the medical aid that the people of syria desperately need, stephanie decker al jazeera. >> in afghanistan a council of elders approves a security deal to keep american troops in that country beyond next year but the man who urged the council to sign the pact now appears to be the one holding it up and al jazeera jane ferguson reports in kabul on the afghan president's about face. >> this was meant to be day of agreement but many left feeling more confused than ever. the lawyer which is a gathering of afghan representatives was overwhelmingly in favor of the security pact with the u.s. and wanted signed immediately. that was in reference to president karzai's announcement on thursday that he will not
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sign until after elections next april and he stuck to his position on sunday that he needed more time to get a better deal from washington. that didn't satisfy the head of the gerga and the drama on stage played out live on tv. >> translator: i want to repeat again, americans cannot go into our houses after the bilateral document and cannot kill anyone in their house, the afghan people will be safe and peace will come and it will not be a case of americans in our bases and a war in our country, i do not accept that and this is historica historical. >> what the president is saying is right that americans do not have a right to enter afghan houses and gave it in writing and promised and a super power can't break the promise and if they do we are ready to protest.
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>> sir, no protests terminating bilateral we have to promise that they are not killing afghans in their houses and have to do that. okay, all right, then sign this first. if they break the promise then we know what to do. >> translator: no, first they have to prove it. you sign it. if you don't sign we will be upset and leave and sign it so we settle this issue. >> reporter: karzai opposition said his delay tactics come from a desire to control the upcoming elections. >> it's not about the concerns that the afghan people have about some bilateral agreement with the military operations or jurisdiction. his demand is personal and he mentioned part of it in his speech. he linked the signing of the agreement with the elections. >> and he believes karzai wants
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the u.s. to support a candidate of his choosing. whatever his motives for such decisions president karzai's political moves clearly put him on the lead for the security pact for sometime yet. jane ferguson, al jazeera kabul afghanistan. >> the deal calls for 15,000 foreign troops to stay in afghanistan for another ten years without a security agreement, the u.s. has said it will have to pull all troops out and world by a cricket star protest u.s. drone strikes. crowds were block agree major road used by nato convoys heading for pakistan but police moved in today to keep the activists from stopping supply trucks and it was ordered by cricket player khan and six were killed friday by the drone
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attack. and not approved by the government, interim president says public gatherings of more than ten people must be cleared by police but didn't stop hundreds from marching in cairo. the law is aimed at supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi and say it's a blow to political freedom. temperatures rising and it may send the mercury higher in a once cool and pristine forest and using her camera to show race in one of america's most diverse cities. and a possible modern miracle in history and pope francis said what the church says are the remains of st. peter. you are looking at a live picture of dallas this morning, they are getting cold rain right now from the massive storm moving across the country. ♪
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power of the people until we restore our freedoms and rights.
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good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm
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stephanie sy, just ahead what some say is a real world example of climate change and we will take you to a once beautiful oasis that is changing because of human development and let's see what temperatures we will see across the nation today and nicole mitchell is back. >> it was a shift for a lot of people over the weekend as the cold air, the double shots moved in and starting to get chilly this morning once again. i want to reference texas and look at dallas officially 33 degrees but outside the city they are below freezing and this is part of the line where it's a mix of rain and get to some locations within the suburbs and it's snow and a lot of freezing precipitation around the region with the temperatures. across the rest of the country, the northeast definitely dropped and the temperatures dropped because of the front coming through and this morning in the 20s and the one warm air and the cold air did not sink that far
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south so miami is 73 but the temperatures not going up a lot for the day and we have areas of rain and snow across the country and i'll talk about where it will be a treacherous go today in a little bit. >> nearly a year after the tragedy at sandy hook, a prosecutor will talk about findings during the shooting and holding back 911 calls and the full police report to protect the survivors and the families of victims. a gunman killed 20 children and 6 teachers at the school. now here is what is making business news this morning, wall street starting the week in record territory and how long will it go, stock futures have a positive start to the day and the dow jones opens 16,065, s&p is 1804 and a 7-week winning streak and nasdaq is 4,39991.
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in asia markets and tokyo gaining 1 1/2%. and j.c. penney and they are kicked out of the s&p 500 and they are leaving after losing half of the market value this year. and the demotion comes signs of stabilizing under mike ulman and oil is falling and the deal with iran is raising speculation that iran oil will flow in again and crude was down $1.50 a barrel and cost per gallon is up 3 cents and the survey said the average is $3.25. new numbers suggest people are still having a tough time coping with the weak economy, bank
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rate.com says americans' main priority now is staying on top of bills and paying down debt and building up savings and has barely changed since last year. >> people have been unplowed or working on a reduced income and if they are working their incomes have not gone up and a lot of that really makes it difficult for people to feel like they are making any financial headway. >> survey found a third of americans feel financially secure. the world's wealthy and developing nations argued the last two weeks about global warming but now a plan is in place to lower greenhouse gas emissions and the agreement of the u.n. conference in poland is the first in a solution of climate change and during a fight in may lee malaysia and it's effecting the climate and here is andrew thomas. >> in a region famous for heat
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and humidity than hills the highlands have long been a favorite escape and brittish treated them as home away from home and the environment was perfect for growing tea after independence the highlands were just as popular with malaysia and you can see the appeal but the highlands are changing fast and housing developments are being approved on an unprecedented scale and forest hill sites are cleared for agriculture too. and two thirds of a mossy forest that covered hill summits where they poked into clouds is gone. the changing landscape is changing the weather, it's getting warmer. >> it was damp and water always dripping there and because of the mist in the area but right now it's completely dry here and no forest and so hot i can see the sky and the sunshine is on
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my face and i can feel the heat. >> reporter: the weather station has been monitoring the climate for decades and over the last ten years the average temperature has gone up two degrees celsius and that is a dramatic change. and temperatures are still rising. for tea and other crops that need cooler temperatures, that's a real threat. it will be bad to grow because it's warmer number one. number two pest population can increase and attack more pests. >> reporter: they combine with the hill side farm workers to conmate river water with ecoli and led to landslides and the silt of rivers and lakes and the representatives will not talk on film and for three weeks the top official in the area would not
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return phone calls or e-mails and when we went to his office his staff said he was unavailable and they were unique but now it's unaccountable development that is changing not just appearance but climate too and andrew thomas al jazeera in malaysia. >> we heard from diplomates and world leaders on the iran agreement and now we have agreement from ordinary people in iran. a battle for power in bangkok and what is behind the largest demonstrations in years and black and white photos take on a whole new meaning of photographer's snapshot of america's whitest major city. >> manning versus brady is a match up and a sunday night thriller coming up, in sports.
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♪ determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites,
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hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. (vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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. ♪ welcome back, i'm stephanie sy and the top stories at this hour, 8 people are dead after a wintry storm moved through the southwest making roads treacherous and flights cancelled and could hamper the thanksgiving holiday. they are meeting with u.s. and russian diplomates for a peace conference and find thousands of children have been targeted by snipers and tortures in the war. and talks of slowing the iran program and he has been hailed as an ambassador for peace in tehran but they slammed the agreement and some members of congress want more sanctions against iran. on the streets of iran there is renewed optimism and many say
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they hope the deal hopes in decades of economic isolation. >> is it a good or bad deal? depends who you speak to in iran. but most people agree that any deal is worth it and to end decades of hostility and sanctions. >> translator: it's shameful because if a government is against another government why would they punish that and they punished for 34 years. >> reporter: the powers agreed to suspend limited sanctions on the auto industry and allow the purchase of iran oil and help iran in the humanitarian field including in the importation of medicine. >> translator: after lifting sanctions people can buy things easier because the prices will go down and people wouldn't be under pressure. for example i have children
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abroad studying and should send money to them and the price of u.s. currency has dropped. >> reporter: in total the deal will provide $7 billion in sanctions relief but that is not much compared to what iran lost under the current sanctions, at least $80 billion in oil revenues since the start of last year. >> in the coming months if united states tries to cheat iran or tries to twist the deal in a way which makes it hurtful, then that could hurt the deal definitely. >> reporter: if pleasing iran is a challenge and hard liners will be tougher and most of them don't think iran should be negotiating at all, convincing them otherwise is a task that president rohani will have to talk about and the supreme
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leader is too and he has applauded talk with iran's negotiating team and may be his voice is the only thing that can silence hard liners and give the deal a chance of succeeding. >> the agreement with iran is the result of nearly three months of intense diplomacy and we have an iran presidential and president of the american iran council. and thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you for having me. >> do you think this goes to helping not build more nuclear in the future? >> yes, it does and iran will never, ever build a weapon or seek any nuclear weapon. this is a contract that really
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makes iran a completely nuclear free. so if you read the first paragraph of the agreement which most people don't because they only see that the list, the first paragraph of the agreement makes iran not just a part of the public, iran the country, okay, o obliged to never develop a nuclear weapon and that is a tough statement. >> how tough it is depends on how enforceable it is and do you feel like the iranians are at the point now where they will allow the inspections that this agreement lays out to the degree that the agreement says? >> well, if the republic was not ready for this it will not go to the trouble and they had 10-12 years of problems with this and they are stuck with this,
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enrichment issue and ready to get rid of the problem perhaps at some point altogether because it's not helping them, it's not helping the iranian people and it's not helping anybody with the national community. i honestly believe they are serious in coming clean on the nuclear issue and i will trust them on what they say this time. >> reporter: what about the fact that they continue to keep the centrifuges? >> they have spent billions and billions on the programs. whether they are wrong or right, this program started, believe it or not, under the shaw, that is 30, almost 40 years ago. the planned nuclear reactor is
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40 years plus and this is not just what was started, they inherited the problem and over time for good or bad reason, i think largely mistakely they started this building this up because they never thought that they will encounter the kind of resistance they did. they got surprised with the kind of resistance that they encountered in the process and then they locked up in a huge investment with all of the facilities and they are trying to gradually build it down and seems to me it will take time, after all this country has pride and dignity and they just can't easily say, you know, this is what we did and it was a mistake, let's get on with it, they have to find a way out. >> even last week we heard the support leader continuing to make rather at least when he was speaking to the hard liners in iran still making assertive
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comments about the iranian right to enrich uranium so why talk about it if they are abandoning all of it? >> the issue of dignity and they just wanted to continue saying that it is dead right to have it and if they don't want to have it, that is a different issue. i think the issue of right has been over played. i honestly believe what we have to deal with is the nuclear issue and even in this deal, agreement, it doesn't really give iran that right to end reach although it gives the right to a peaceful nuclear program and it talks about enrichment immediately there after and says any agreement and enrichment of uranium has to be
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satisfactory so that right issue is hanging in there and i don't think that is a useful concept to hold on to or to get hung up with. >> as you say perhaps a matter of pride, thanks very much, near the president of the iranian council and great to have your insights here. >> u.s. lawmakers are not as sold on the iranian deal as the white house and democrats and republicans ask if they would live up to the agreement and ready to impose sanctions if iran doesn't follow through. secretary of state john kerry said sanctions would hurt future negotiations with iran and japan is not backing down with china over islands in the east china sea, it was uncovered by the island and will not recognize it, japan, china and tie --
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tiwaan and could lead to an armed confrontation. two people claim to have the upper hand after the presidential election in honduras and he says he is well ahead by rival castro is the wife of manuel who was forced from office a few years ago and final results are not expected until later today and they clashed across thailand. thousands turned out for a second day of antigovernment protests and threatened to occupy government buildings until the country leader watt steps down and want to stop what they see as continued influence from the country's deposed leader and veronica has more
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from bangkok. sorry we apologize we don't have that package from veronica so we will move on. hundreds of angry protesters clashed with police today new crane and angry about the government's decision to shift allegiance from the west to russia and tens of thousands demonstrated in kiave when an agreement was dropped and it was the nation's largest since the orange revolution nine years ago and russia threatened to impose trade sanctions if the deal with eu was signed. charges should be stepped up against three white college students accused of abusing their black roommate and they are charged with a hate crime and they say charges should be filed and the suspects taunted the student with racial slurs and forced him to wear a bike lock around his neck and a fourth student has been arrested
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in the court. portla portland, oregon is the greenest and whitest and some say there are historical reasons that so few blocks live there. 27-year-old photographer is in downtown portland looking for something hard to find. >> here we go. >> reporter: black faces. >> i was wondering if i could take your picture, if you might be interested. the memphis tennessee native had no idea when she moved there three years ago that it was the whitist major city in america with 76% of the population white according to the census and 6% are black. recently she began capturing the images of rare black faces as part of an essay she calls black portlanders. what do you get out of this? >> a sense of connection. >> reporter: she says portland
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is white by design. it not only excluded blacks from moving here but wrote the exclusion in its constitution. >> before the civil war oraganians adopted three times exclusion laws to make it illegal for a black person to come and live in oregon. >> they were repealed by 1927 but their legacy lives on. >> the problem for african/americans in oregon is simply you don't have that cultural context you might find in other places and larger cities for example. >> there are a few signs of black culture in portland and neighborhoods where blacks were forced to live during segregation, a policy known as red lining. where have they gone? suburbs and replaced by white families looking for affordable housing in the city. steven green grew up here and owns a restaurant in an area where decades ago blacks were refused loans to start
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businesses. green believes there is fertile opportunity here for blacks not only to live but thrive and the tourists from philadelphia were shocked by faces and made a game of it. >> if we see one black person it's one. if we see another three we are like four and we keep adding on. and i believe it is now. >> six, dave has three and you are. >> i'm like 1 1/2, 2 and not doing too well. >> they would move here in a heartbeat for the neighborhoods and art scene and opportunity. it's what she sees in her photography collection to showcase the small population and culture in portland. tonya with al jazeera in portland o oregon. >> african/americans makeup 6% the population and triple the
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statewide average and we are here with sports and a match up in sunday night football. good morning. >> good morning to you. tom brady is 36 and manning is 37, neither a spring chicken and the match up sunday could be one of the last times we see them go head to head, the living leg ends and brady 9-4 edge and broncos 24-0 to the locker room thanks to three patriot turn overs and you thought the thanksgiving goose was cooked, wrong, and finding his favorite and target and manning has more than a goofy hat on his mind and down three in the fourth and dumps it to julian who wore his big boy pants and catching nine and patriots take the lead and new england 31-24 and manning didn't play well but three minutes to go and thomas and it was 31 and send us into ot.
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that is where we find ex patriot star to return a punch, at the last second he tries to tell teammates to get away from the ball and tony does not get the memo and get it and kick the field goal and patriots 34-31 win and afterwards the question had to be asked how did the patriots save their bacon in the second half? >> talk about it all the time and you are board of hearing it and the execution was better and didn't give ourselves a chance on the first half and got a big lead and found ways to put one play in front after the next one and next one and next one and scored some points. >> on the field, it's disappointing and shortly we have a chance to beat a good team at their place and still felt like we had a chance there, getting the ball there at the very end, i thought we would have the ball last and we were going to score to win the game or could have been a tie.
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so i hated the way that ended and not getting a chance there to get our hands on the ball. >> reporter: let's go to south beach, shall we and it's miami gardens and it's the distance between them and the bullying scandal and 53 td pass to mike wallace was a distraction and dolphins dolphins 16-3 and 83 yard drive and cut the fingers lead to three and another 80-yard drive in the final minutes and got it done, cam newton wide open greg for the game winner, panthers win 20-16 for the 7th straight win. now let's ride the chiefs charges roller coaster in kc and they take 28-24 lead and raise your hands in the front of the roller coaster and san diego
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speeds up ward and goes to green and green sees lots of green and gets mean and going to the end zone and 60 yards for the touchdown and san diego back on top and back comes kc and two minutes to go and alex smith has six and kc retakes the lead, 28 seconds left and rivers lays it out and 2-2 and rivers through 300 and win 41-38 and kc dropped three straight and rematch against manning and the broncos. the jekyll and hyde and if you read it jekyll is meek and hyde is the beast and mr. hyde set out and the cards defense all game long and forcing him to throw it who takes it back for
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six and the red birds hammer the colts 40-11. and that's your look at morning sports and back to you stephanie. >> putting faith to the test. the vatican displays what are the remains of st. peter but they want proof that they are really belong to the first pope. a volcano forces thousands to flee and looking at areas of heavy rain and snow, it's going to be treacherous travel out there and that is coming up. >> looking live at a shot of dallas, texas hit hard by a massive storm system sweeping through the south and heading east. ♪
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>> and now, a techknow minute...
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♪ and now, a techknow minute... welcome back to al jazeera america, just ahead pope francis displays what the church be believes remains of st. peter and stirring debate from the faithful and nonbelievers alike and let's look at the
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precipitation across the u.s. and metrologist nicole mitchell is here. >> we have a mess because we had a little of everything as the storm has gone through and rain and snow and freezing precipitation and we will get right too it. looking a broad look and seeing through parts of texas and oklahoma and arkansas is pink and freezing but as it moves along it's a low pressure air that will skirt across the south and up the east coast and over 24 hours look at the heavy rain expected in the south, evidently consistent, 1-3", isolated spots more and watch for flood concerns and travel problems in tuesday and wednesday and on the north end of this snow this morning from iowa up through the great lakes and watch for that too, it's a slick morning and take your time and back to you. >> at least 5,000 people have known to have died after typhoon
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haiyan struck two weeks ago and many are homeless and dependent on government aid because livelihoods have been wiped out too and we have their story. >> it's been two weeks since the family had a proper meal and the children are hungry. they have lost their home, belongings and livelihood and he doesn't know how he will be able to feed his family. >> translator: it hurts for a father to see his children go hungry, i have no food to give them and i don't know where to go, i hope there are kind hearts to help us because everything we worked for her is gone. >> reporter: and it destroyed everything in its path and wiping out coastal villages and displacing millions of people. at least 5,000 people have been killed and the number keeps rising. the devastation is staggering and although the death toll here is relatively low compared to
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other areas in the central philippines, 95% of the crops have been destroyed, that is a big blow to a town that is dependent on agriculture. this is where she worked and it destroyed the farm and the industry is now wiped out and sugar cain farmers work here for months and it's harvest season but too are left with nothing. and price in vegetables were not spared either. everything is destroyed. >> translator: this is very difficult for my town. how can they recover? where do they start? it's a long-term problem. >> reporter: and central philippines has been battered by natural disasters but this is unprecedented and government resources are stretched, having to provide for the basic needs of the millions of people who have been displaced. there is nothing left here now
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and people here would like to start all over again. somewhere with a future they say but they do not even know where to go. al jazeera in central philippines. >> according to a risk assessment firm the storm cost about $14 billion for the philippine's economy. more than 15,000 indonesias are leaving because of the volcano and it has been spewing ash for months and alert is at the highest level and military ordering evacuation and this is nearly 130 active volcanos in the pacific ring of fire. putin will meet for the first time with pope francis and they oppose military intervention there and he will meet with italian president and history at the vatican for the first time
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relics to be the bones of st. peter and believe he was one of the 12 disciples and became the first pope after the death of jesus and phil has more from rome. >> crowds in the vatican for sunday mass is not unusual. but this is. the bones of the first ever pope, blessed here by the man who took the role on near 2000 years later and this urn contains what are believes to be remains of st. peter and crucified in the year 64 ad and found in a tomb with his name on it 72 years ago they have been wrapped in purple cloth a sign of someone important. there is no dna and the feet are missing and there is some skepticism. >> we can be nearly sure that the tomb is under the bacilica
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but can say nothing about the bones because the theological data is missing. >> translator: if the science can't confirm it then it's all a matter of faith for me. >> what matters is the fact that we as christians give relevant importance to the bones. >> translator: all the evidence says they are st. peters before if you don't want to believe you won't. >> reporter: remains were taken back inside, the first sight of daylight in years over in seconds and the bones got the blessing and the crowd got their chance to see all be it from a far. for catholics this is all about one issue, faith and no conclusive proof that those are the bones of st. peter but those discovered here that doesn't matter and they believe, science and religion may differ on so many issues but here today science will not be getting a look in. al jazeera. >> reporter: previous tests on
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the remains indicated they came from a man in his 60s. here is what we are working on for the next hour, how a man who has been subjected to new york city's controversial stop and frisk policy twice is teaching young people what to do if they are in the same situation. john henry. >> the biggest names in college basketball met sunday and coming up, next hour an upset between louisville and north carolina. >> and strengthening storm system is already creating trouble on the roads and will cause travel delays for thanksgiving and have the forecast. >> and thomas will be back with you in 2 1/2 minutes.
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>> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> a large and deadly storm system is moving across the sufficient. how it could snarl holiday travel plans. iran's nuclear deal is causing controversy, the road blocks that threaten the agreement. our report is set to be made public today on the massacre at sandy who can where 20 children and six teachers were killed. >> it is part of the american culture, you can't escape it. >> civil rights leaders are calling for charges against white students accused of abusing their black roommate at a california university.
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>> a deadly storm is barreling across the country, taking eight lives. good to have you with us this morning. i'm thomas drayton. freezing rain and heavy snow hampered much of the southwest, now is headed for the east coast just before millions of travelers hit the road before thanksgiving. we have more on this serious storm. >> this storm is so serious, it has a name. bereas is collapsing roof took place and causing car crashes like the one in new mexico that killed a 4-year-old girl. now it's bearing down on the northeast just in time for one of the busiest travel days of the year. >> icy temps, freezing rains, flash floods and heavy snow. the deadly western storm is not letting up after slamming the
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southwest, moving into the midwest and now barren for the northeast. the winery conditions caused hundreds of spinouts, rollovers and pileups. those car crashes blamed for almost all of the eight people killed in the storm's path. in california, rescue teams found a body near downed power lines and a woman was killed when a tree fell on her parked car. in texas and oklahoma, ice halted the highways and caused treacherous travel. >> it's hard to keep control of your car especially under the bridges and stuff. it whips you. >> whipping winds in california worsened wildfires as the storm dutched heavy snow in nevada. >> we've had almost as much water content out of this storm as we had most of the season last winter. >> some folks got hit with it. >> we need it, it's good, we've been so dry. >> four feet of snow fell on the
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four corners area. some areas are not used to this kind of weather at all. >> i don't know what this stuff is. >> it's all white! what is this stuff? >> this storm kept slamming away on sunday pushing through texas. outside of dallas, a tour bus carrying willie snell son's band that hit a pillar on the highway. nelson was not onboard, but three band members were hurt. to avoid accidents on the runways and keep flights flowing, workers at dallas/fort worth international airport deiced planes. already, more than 300 flights have been canceled, making for long lines and a lot of waiting. >> it's not looking good for holiday travelers as the storm is set to hit washington, d.c., philadelphia, new york city and boston on wednesday, the day before thanksgiving. triple-a expects nearly 40 million people will be on the roads this week traveling for the holidays. >> it will be a challenge for many of them. thank you. for more on where this storm
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system is headed next, let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> the low pressure's going to skirt across the south then up the east coast. that's why so many will see a problem heading to the holiday. what we see right now, here's the broad picture and you can see snow near the great lakes to the freezing precipitation. oklahoma, parts of north texas dealing with that. this rain is going to become more as it skirts across the south. we add cold air as that system dropped from the north. you can kind of see this going through the rest of the day. eventually by tomorrow, texas starts to clear out. as me mentioned, it's on the move, tuesday through the south, wednesday up the coastline. at least it moves quickly, cleared out by thursday. on the backside of this, we could be dealing with winds and problems from that, but a lot of travel delays tuesday, wednesday and what we're dealing with this morning, combinations of the
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yellow are areas that could even see thunderstorms, the rain tomorrow through the south will be heavy, one to three inches consistently. isolated places getting more. you worry about flood concerns, as well. we have brutal temperatures this morning, including around freezing in texas. i'll get more on the temperature side of this story coming up in just a couple minutes. >> i know you'll be watching it closely. thank you. >> it's called a new material in relations between iran and united states after more than 30 tense years. iran and 30 world leaders have a deal calling for iran to slow its nuclear program. there is stiff opposition from israel and some members of congress. we explain what's at stake. >> the hand shakes and hugs that marked this first agreement now an image for the history books, and so the spin begins as each side claims victory.
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>> it has been written clearly in the text of this agreement that iran will continue its enrichment, and therefore i announce to the people of iran, that enrichment will continue in the same way as before. >> the agreement says iran will continue to enrich uranium only up to 5%, in exchange for an estimated $7 billion in sanctions relief. the agreement spins out the end goal of future talks, that iran will be able to enjoy nuclear energy. u.s. secretary of state john kerry stressed that doesn't mean what it sounds like. any country has a right to a peaceful nuclear program. that there is a defined right within the npt. it does not mean you have the right to enrich. >> his words an attempt to calm the fears and anger of israel, the prime minute officer outraged by the deal. he wants iran stripped of all
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nuclear capability. >> israel is not bound by this agreement. we can't and will not allow a regime that calls for the destruction of israel to obtain the means to achieve this goal. we will not allow iran to have a nuclear weapons capability. >> his allies in the u.s. congress expressing the same outrage, even promising they may pass additional sanctions on iran even if the president has agreed not to. >> you're going to see on capitol hill again a bipartisan effort to try to make sure that this is not the final agreement, because people know this administration is strong on announcements, long on announcements, but very short on follow through. >> allies and members of congress feeling shut out of the first negotiations, vowing that won't happen again. they want their demands met even if they don't actually have a seat at this table. >> let's bring in aljazeera's
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lisa stark, joining us from washington. good morning to you. what's the congressional reaction been? >> congress is out for the thanksgiving holiday, but that hasn't stopped them from weighing in. a lot of reaction has been negative from represents and even the president's democratic alice. chuck schumer, the number three man in the senate has said he is very concerned about this deal and actually thinks it will be more likely that republicans and democrats will come together to pass additional sanctions. senator bob menendez from new jersey chairs the senate foreign relations committee said the deal doesn't go for enough demanding iran dismantle nuclear capability, so the president facing a tough battle. as lawmakers come back from recess, they will definitely discuss this. >> how is the white house reacting trying to stop congress
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from moving forward on sanctions? >> even before the deal was worked out, they were trying to keep congress in the loop. secretary are kerry went up to capitol hill to talk to the senators. the white house had a number of them to the white house to talk to the president. the white house is heaping a lot of praise on congress, saying we only got to this point because you were willing to put tough sanctions in a few years ago. let's wait and see what happens. that a number of members on the hill have indicated they may give the white house this six month window, have sanctions ready to go if need be. that's what the white house wants. one thing the administration is not saying yet is whether they would veto sanctions if congress moves forward too soon. >> still a lot of work ahead. lisa, thank you. >> demonstrators clashed with police across thailand as thousands turned out for a second day of anti-government protest in bangkok. protestors have entered the
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compound of the foreign ministry, demanding the resignation of the country's leader. they want to stop what they call continued influence from the countries deposed leader. the rallies are the largest since the former prime minister was compiled five years ago. >> pro defendantors clashed with police in ukraine, angry about the government's sudden decision to shift allegiance from the west to russia. tens of thousand us demonstrated in kiev. the protest was the largest since the orange revolution nine years ago. european officials say russia threatened to impose trade sanctions if the deal with the e.u. was signed. >> in libya, nine soldiers are dead after clashes with opposition fighters. at least 47 people are wounded. officials say gunfire broke out today in benghazi outside a checkpoint run by a group suspected in a 2012 attack on a u.s. consul building that left
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12 dead. >> growing discontent in pakistan about u.s. drone strikes. demonstrators trying to block nato envoys heading to afghanistan. six people were killed friday in the latest drone attack. >> a developing story this morning, a conference between the syrian government and opposition groups will start on january 22 in geneva. the news came from the u.n. secretary general. the statement did not say whether iran will in fact participate. in the most recent fighting between rebels and government forces in syria, at least 160 people were killed. rebels are trying to break through a blockade near the capitol, damascus. loyalists to bashar al assad are stopping supplies of food, water and medicine. international aid workers think
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the forces are trying to starve residents. what do we know about the conference? >> we've just heard in the statement from the u.n. secretary general that the peace conference, the syrian peace conference will starts here in geneva wednesday, january 22. we've waited a long while for that date to be fixed. now it has been. that should concentrate a lot of minds. it will be the first time since two and a half years of conflict with the syrian government will be around the same table as the opposition. it was described as a mission of hope, meant to set up a transitional government with full executive powers over the military and security forces. all parties are called on to show leadership and vision to make sure the peace conference succeeds. he said it will be unforgivable
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not to seize this opportunity to end the war which has raged for too long and caused such suffering and destruction you. >> what more cab you tell us about eye rap's participation in the talks? >> that's one of the many hurdles still facing the diplomats who are arranging this peace conference. there's been a lot of speculation, whether iran and saudi arabia will be invited to the table. the latest news from the diplomats here is iran and saudi arabia will attend, but at side meetings, not around the same table. that is the diplomatic word here in geneva at the moment, just one of the many obstacles that has to be overcome. now a date has been fixed, all the diplomats involved in this tense negotiation both on the united states and the russian side will try to make sure it will be a success, to make sure that this long war finally
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reaches an end. >> david, thank you. >> anger in egypt over a new law about rights groups call a blow to political freedom. protests that are not approved by the government are now banned. interim president says public gatherings of more than 10 people must be cleared by police. the law didn't stop hundreds from marching in cairo. the protestors say the law is aimed at supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. >> connecticut officials will release a report on the sandy hook massacre in which 20 children and six teachers were killed. it will not include the full state police evidence file. we have more. >> almost one year ago, 20 first graders and six women were shot dead at sandy hook elementary school. the gunman, add zambrano lanza
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had killed his own mother before driving to the school. police estimate it took lanza less than five minutes to commit his crimes and commit suicide in the school. he carried with him a bush master rifle, two handguns and multiple rounds of ammunition. a second rifle was found in his car. the shootings shocked the nation. president obama led tribute you to a special memorial service two days later. >> can we honestly say that we're doing enough to keep our children, all of them, safe from harm? >> it ignited a nationwide campaign for begun reform law. a bill was drafted and passed around the senate for a few weeks, calling for a ban on semi automatic weapons and limits to the size of magazines. it went nowhere. polls showed public opinion in favor of gun law reform high immediately after the tragedy
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been to wane as the year went on. today, a summary will be released at 3:00 p.m. there are hopes it will reveal more information and some answers to what happened that morning. authorities say victims' families will be briefed on the report before it's made public, but there will be no new photos or video. that's banned from public release under connecticut law, designed to protect the families and people of sandy hook as they brace for the first anniversary of the day that forever changed their lives. >> the 911 recordings from the shootings have never been released. there's no word on when the full reports will be made public. >> a surprise decision in afghanistan, the countries president says he won't sign a security pact with the u.s. right away. why he's stilling on the plan to keep u.s. troops there. >> facebook c.e.o. slams the federal government.
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his take on the n.s.a. spying practices and the changes he wants to see come about from the scandal. >> after tense negotiations, world leaders reached an agreement on a plan to deal with global warning, how it could change the outlook for climate change. >> you're looking live at the capitol building in washington, d.c. on a very chilly monday morning. coming right back.
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. a security pact that would determine the future role of u.s. soldiers in afghanistan hangs in limbo. the country's president shrugged off the advice of a national council that approved that deal. in a moment, we'll see how tensions erupted in a heated exchange over that plan. >> first, let's look at temperatures across the nation today with meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> i can just say cold, back to you, but we'll talk a little detail. it is chilly out there this morning. temperatures really dropped over the weekend because of that strong area of cold air that
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moved in. you definitely felt it yesterday in the northeast, temperatures dropping into the 20's. midwest, chicago, you might have noticed the temperature was 25 and this is the wind chill temperature, so this is the one area we have winds gusting in the 20-30-mile per hour range, making it feel colder if you have any exposed skin. i mentioned the temperatures had dropped in the northeast, even teens this morning in pittsburgh. in texas, temperatures around freezing with the moisture means there is freezing precipitation that you'll have to be careful on. >> bundle up. >> an iceberg about the size of manhattan is floating away from antarctica. it's being called b31 and slight images showed it broke away earlier this month. scientists are tracking it to see if it will reach the southern ocean, where it could disrupt shipping. >> the world's wealthy and
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developing nations have a plan in place to lower greenhouse gas emissions, reached saturday in poland. the two sides argued for the last two weeks about global warming. the new plan will be seemed in paris in 2015 and take effect in 2020. >> in afghanistan, an agreement was approved that would keep americans in the country beyond next year. the elders who signed the pact now appear to be the ones holding it up. we report from kabul on the afghan's president about-face. >> this was meant to be a day of agreement, but many 11 feeling more confused than ever. the late jirga was overwhelmingly in favor of security pact with the u.s. and want it signed immediately. that was in reference to president karzai's announcement on thursday, but he won't sign the deal until after elections next april. on sunday, he stuck to his
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position that he needed more time to get a better deal from washington. that didn't satisfactory the head of the jirga and the drama on stage played out live on t.v. >> i want to repeat again, americans cannot go into our houses after the bilateral documents. they cannot kill anyone in their house. the afghan people will be safe and peace will come. it will not be a case of americans sitting in their bases and then we have a war in our country. i don't accept that. this decision is historical. >> whatever the president is saying is right, that americans do not have any rye to enter afghan houses. they have given us that in writing and they promised. a super power cannot break their promise. if they do, then we are ready to pro testify. >> sir, no protests, terminating
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the bilateral, they have to promise that they are not killing afghans in their promise. they have to do that. >> ok. all right. then sign this first. if they break the promise, then we know what to do. >> no! first they have to prove it. >> here, sign it, if you don't sign, we'll be sup jet and leave. sign it so we settle this issue. >> karzai's opposition said his delay tactics come from am desire to control the upcoming elections. >> it's not about those concerns that the afghan people have about some articles in the bilateral agreement including the military operations or jurisdiction. his demand is personal, and he mentioned part of it in the inauguration speech. he linked the signs of the bilateral agreement with the elections. >> abdullah believe's karzai
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wants the u.s. to support a candidate of his choosing. whatever his motive for such decisions, his moves clearly put him on the lead for this security pact for sometime yet. jane ferguson, aljazeera, kabul, afghanistan. >> we're just receiving reports that susan rice, the national security advisor is in afghanistan meeting with the afghan president soon. >> facebook founder mark zuckerberg has sharp words for the u.s. government about n.s.a. spying. during an interview, he said government officials dropped the ball on conducting surveillance programs. >> i think the government really blew it on this one. i honestly think that they're continuing to blow it in some ways and i hope that they become more transparent in that part of it. >> earlier this month, facebook and four other tech companies asked congress to reign in the n.s.a. they want to counter false reports that they give
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intelligence agencies direct access to the servers. >> business headlines, wall street starting in record territory. investors want to know how long the bulls will kept running. stock futures are higher, dow jumps 61 points signaling a possible start in trading. the nasdaq is nearing the 4,000 mark. >> overseas, european markets are higher in early trading. in asia, markets closing mixed with tokyo gaining another 1.5%. >> another blow to struggling j.c. penney, shares are falling on word the company is being kicked out of the s&p 500. jcpenney is leaving after losing more than half of its market value this year.
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its devotion comes after signs of stability under its new boss. >> chrysler expects to set a price range for initial offerings early this week. the carmaker hopes to raise at much as $2 billion. chrysler majority owner by the italian company fiat. it acquired chrysler as part of the auto industry bailout in 2008 and 2009. fiat wants that to complete the offering in the next two weeks. >> scary travel news heading into the holidays, bowing talking about possible engine icing problems. it recommends that planes avoid flying near thunderstorms that might contain ice crystals. the effected models have issued the warning. >> microsoft sold more than a million x boxes, keeping pace
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with the play station four, which also sold out its first day. >> outrage from the iran nuclear deal from the u.s. to the middle east. >> the naacp getting involved in accusations of racial hazing at a california university. why they say enough hasn't been done in the wake of the incident. >> fighting back against new york city's controversial stop and frisk policy, how one man is looking to educate others after his own run-ins with police. >> manning versus brady, highlights from a sunday night thriller coming up in sports.
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and here's a look at the headlines... >> al jazeera america, there's more to it. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is
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that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> a very chilly start to the
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monday morning here in in the morning city. you're looking live at a beautiful shot of the big apple. good morning and welcome back to aljazeera marrying. it's good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. >> the deal to limit iran's nuclear capabilities, we go to israeli for more on the anger there. >> outrage is growing after racial hazing by white students of a black roommate. the charges against three students are said not to be tough enough. >> israel said the geneva agreement on iran's nuclear program will make the world more dangerous, the israeli prime minute at her calling it a "historic mistake." nick joins us from jerusalem. world leaders are describing this as a breakthrough, the israeli prime minister claims it
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is based on deceit. >> all analysts that i speak to say that the u.s.-israeli relationship will survive and the two sides agree to disagree. it shows i'd dealingologyically how far apart they are on iran. if iran were to decide to make a nuclear bomb even after this deal, it would only take about six weeks according to israelis and u.s. intelligence. the u.s. is ok with that. israel said no, that's not good enough. we want an iran that cannot possibly make a nuclear bomb and if they decided to, would take a year or two. the determination of whether this split or this tension right now between the u.s. and israel will continue is the long term deal. in six months, the u.s. says it will get a deal that will severely limit iran's ability to
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create a nuclear weapon. israel said ok it better be that good and if not, this train between us will continue. >> the israeli prime minister said israel is ready to defend itself against any threat without any assistance. here's what he had to say. >> israel has many friends and allies, but when they're mistaken, it's my obligation to speak out clearly and openly and say so. it's my solemn responsibility to protect and defend the one and only jewish state. >> in light of this deal, though, does iran still pose a threat to israel? >> i think for prime minister netanyahu, he truly believes that iran is a threat. iran supports military groups on
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israeli borders and has missiles that can reach into israel. i've spoken to a lot of people who know netanyahu and they say he sees the west as it was prime minister chamberlain of england. netanyahu thinks a deal is being made with iranian leaders when the iranian leaders secretly plan to have a nuclear weapon. iran says it has no desire to make a nuclear weapon. netanyahu believes they do. if there is a long term deal in six months that truly does limit iran's ability to create a nuclear weapon and the rhetoric from iran calls down over israel, then netanyahu said fine, we made a deal, we are very aggressive on the last deal, we'll agree on the long
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term deal. if it doesn't do what he wants it to, you will hear him severely criticize the u.s. over this. >> the sanctions against iran were a big part of the negotiations in geneva. in exchange for billions in relief, iran has temporarily agreed to stop enriching uranium beyond 5%. it agreed to give greater access to inspectors, including daily access at nuclear sites. the deal calls for plutonium enrichment halted. >> the obama administration had to sell the deal to nervous allies and congressional scent particulars. new sanctions could prompt iran to abandon the nuclear freeze. this deal has been a long time coming, but given the details of
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this tentative agreement, was it accomplished too quickly. >> i think you can argue the opposite, that it took too long to get this deal where iran is very close to having the capability to develop a nuclear weapon. i think this is the best doing that the international community had to stop iran from getting past that flesh hold point. >> looking at this deal, it hats iran's nuclear program but doesn't dismantle this. was this a mistake by the world powers? >> i'm surprised how good a deal the e.p.5 got in this agreement. iran's not getting a lot in the way of sanctions relief. $10 billion seems a lot, but small compared to what ultimately they were looking for. the p5 got pretty intrusive inspections and stopping work on the nuclear plant and delays in enrichment. this is not ideal, not getting everything you want, but it is an agreement laying the
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groundwork for a lodger deal down the world. i think p5 did well here. >> israeli's prime minister announced it as dangerous. what does this mean for the u.s. and israeli moving forward? >> this creates a really interesting wrist, showing the u.s. and israel have very diverge ept interests in the middle east going forward. i wouldn't say it is a break in the releases, but the countries are moving very different directions. the u.s. actively wants dozen gauged from the region as much as they possibly can and i think this worries israeli and for good reason. there's a real shift happening. it's questionable whether the israeli government which has been extremely harsh about this deal. israeli should recognize this is where it's going and the u.s. is moving away from the middle east. >> let's look six months down the road. where's the iranian nuclear program after this expires? >> the disagreement is that they could renew it after six months.
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these are very difficult negotiations. you have a sticking point over the right to enrichment. you are looking at permanent sanctions in position on what the eye raines can do as far as nuclear program, a lot of issues that still need to be involved for a permanent deal. my sense is both sides want to get to that point. i don't think the eye raines make this agreement unless they ultimately want a deal that lifts the sanctions against them. the sanction lift they are getting is nowhere near what they were asking for. >> if it falls apart, where do things stand? >> i think you see a very unlikely situation where another agreement happens down the road. it probably doesn't create the chances of using military force, although all those reasons to me suggest that this may end up holding together. the eye raines have to realize if they vital this greatly, they're neve going to get out from under those sanctions as long as the current regime is in
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power. >> we'll see what the future holds. thanks for joining us this morning. >> two candidates claim to have the upper hand after the presidential elections in honduras. more than half of the ballots from sunday's voting have been counted. leftist rival castro is declaring victory, she is the wife of the former president. he was forced from office four years ago. election officials say final results are expected layer today. >> japan is not backing down in the standoff with china over islands in the east china sea. the air defense zone unveiled by china over the weekend covers the island. japanned foreign minister said he will not recognize it. world leaders fear the dispute could lead to an accidental armed confrontation. >> 54 people in latvia died
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after the roof of a supermarket caved in thursday. officials say soil and materials for garden being built on the roof may have caused that collapse. it is the nationed deadliest disaster since the former soviet republic gained independence in 1991. >> russian president putin will meet today with pope francis. that syria is expected to top the agenda. they have both said they oppose military intervention in syria. during his trip, putin will meet with the italian president. >> more protests are expected today at san jose university in california. four white students are charged with battery and hate crimes, accused of hazing their black roommate. the naacp wants more serious charges. we have more. >> it was in room 704 at the campus village buildings at san jose university where prosecutors say a 17-year-old
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black freshman not only shared a room with four white students, but endured repeated torment. prosecutors last week filed misdemeanor hate crime and battery charges against the freshman who they say began taunting the student with racial comments and placed a bike lock around his neck. over a period of weeks, the students allegedly harassed the 17-year-old by first calling him three-fifths and fraction. prosecutors say the incident's escalated, including hanging a confederate flag in the room, posting pictures of hitler and nazi symbols and writing the "n" word on a black board in the room. they wrestled him to the ground and placed the lock on his neck. >> it doesn't surprise me. i'm not naive to think it can't happen.
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bullying and racial taunting is a part of the american culture. you can't escape it. >> all four students have been suspended by the university, but the naacp says the misdemeanor charges aren't harsh enough. the group demands felony hate crime charges be filed, stating this is not simple hazing or bullying. this is obviously racial based terrorism targeted at their african-american roommate. the case has angered and mobilized students on the campus. they want to know how the and would incidents could go on as long as it did. >> so close to home and we weren't aware of it. no organization let us know that these issues were here. >> our outreach needs to be stronger. our outreach to african-american students should be stronger. he should have known he had somewhere to go. >> multiple calls for action will be held later today, including a demonstration by students. the campus president will appear with officials from the naacp who will demand an investigation by the university officials and call on prosecutors to file more
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serious charges. >> the accused students admitted to police that they harassed the 17-year-old student but called the incidents pranks and jokes, denying that they were racist. >> police are investigating the fatal shooting of a maryland postal worker. the body of tyson jerome barn knelt was found saturday night near his land rover. a one houston thousand dollars reward is being offered for information in the case. >> new york's city stop and frisk policy is making headlines again. one man has been subbed to the policy twice. now he's taking action. we have more. >> for days after being topped by police in his brooklyn neighborhood, this man said he felt powerless. >> they jumped out of the car, four large officers, and were yelling and they were like get on the wall, and it just to me was very bizarre experience,
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being hadn't done anything. they said that if i didn't have i.d. or produce it, i would be going to jail. they basically said to me the next time a cop tells you to do something one better do it. i just remember those words ringing in my ears. >> police let him go after he showed them i.d., but the experience changed him. >> i felt frustrated, i was angry. i just really didn't know what to do. i had this pent-up frustration that was sitting inside and i felt the best way to do something would be to get involved in my community. >> so he started teaching know your rights workshops to young people. they asked us not to show their faces. >> you have to take control of the situation by asking am i being stopped? am i bring arrested? >> the new york police department stop and frisk policy allows people to be stopped and searched if the officers believe they have committed a crime or
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are about to commit a crime. >> according to statistics, more than half a million people were stopped and frisked in 2012. only one in 10 was ever arrested or summoned to court, the rest released without charges. >> a quick survey of this public classroom shows the experience is nothing new. >> show of hands. who in this room has ever been stopped by police officers? >> it happened to me my freshman year. when i came to the school, we used to get out early for half days. i was stopped and they thought i was cutting and they searched my book bag. i didn't know what to do. it was my first tile. i was nervous, like why are they doing this. >> his workshop focuses on showing teens how to stand up for their rights without making the situation worse. >> by stating officer, i know you're asking questions, i have
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i.d., but i don't consent to you searching or questions me. you're letting them know there's a limit to however this is going to go. >> he says when he asserted his rights like that, police have lehim go on his way. just how long the stop and frisk policy will last is unclear. this summer, a federal judge ruled it unconstitution approximately, but it was subsequently overturned. >> more than five mill people have been stopped and questioned under the policy in the last 12 years. frisks were conducted in more than half those incidents. >> john henry smith joining us now with sports and a matchup in sunday night football. >> a matchup featuring tom brady, 36, peyton manning 37. sunday matchup could be one of the last times we see them go head-to-head. fourteenth meeting between these two living legends. brady had a 9-4 edge, but the
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broncos took an edge into the half time longer room thanks to three patriot turnovers. third quarter, brady looking for and finding his favorite target, touchdown. brady dumps it off, the patriots take the lead. late in this one, new england was up 31-24. manning hadn't played that well at all, but with three minutes to go, hits follow mass to send things into o.t. we say walker tries to tell his teammates to get away from the ball. that's a live ball, patriots recover. they kick the field goal that give the patriots a 34-31 win. afterwards, the question had to be asked, how did the patriots save their bacon in the second half.
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>> our execution was better. we didn't give ourselves in the first half with the turnovers. they can a big lead, and we found ways to just put one play after the next one and next one and ended up scoring some points. >> we'll study the film. it's disappointing. we certainly had a chance to beat a good team at their place. we still had a chance at the very end, thought we would have the ball last and would have scored to win the game or it could have ended in a tie. i hate the way that ended and not getting the chance to get our hands on the ball. >> now let's ride the chiefs-chargers roller coaster, eight lead changes in this one. rivers shrinks it to green and green sees lots of green to the end zone, 60 yards, touchdown sand craig, back on top 34-31.
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back comes k.c. under two minutes to go, k.c. retakes the lead. rivers lays it out, throwing for 392 and two touchdowns, the chargers win. neck up, a rematch against peyton manning and the broncos. >> what has gotten into the st. louis rams no you think they've finally seen the value of getting the ball into this guy's hands, scooting to the house. his fourth t.d. of 50 yards or more, rams up 7-0. later, keep an eye on the spot shadow, the rams chris long going after his brother, kyle long, who place for the bears. are they fighting? chris breaks up the fight, big brother chris and the rams would go on to win 42-21.
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to the college hardwood, louisville rolled into sunday as the defending national champs and with a 21 game win streak, the good times would not keep rolling. number 24 north carolina coming off an upset loss to belmont last week pulled off an upset of their own against the number two team in the country, the tar heels hand them their first loss of the season. 93-84 is the final. that's your look at sports this morning. >> looking back at that incident, it's going to be an interesting thanksgiving. >> growing concern in indonesia, thousands ordered to evacuate because of a volcano. >> how one facility is taking com post piling and generating electricity for 900 homes. >> a chinese woman gives birth to a super sized bundle of joy. the hefty amount the newborn registered on the scale, we'll
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tell you, coming up. >> and now a techknow minute...
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>> a look at a plant that's taking elements found in com post piles, turning them into power lighting hundreds of homes. >> first, let's look at potential precipitation across the u.s. today. >> the storm system is bricking a beginnation of rain, snow and freezing precipitation. roads are treacherous out there. taking a broad look across the united states, arkansas through texas is where we're seeing some of that mixed precipitation. on the northern edge of this, places like wisconsin this morning, it's moreent snow, meaning the slick roads are going to the be a problem as this moves across the country, causing travel delays for the thanksgiving holiday. >> more than 15,000 indonesians are leaving the area near the
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country's most active volcano. the emergency alert is at the highest level and the military is ordering evacuations. it is one of 130 active volcanos in the pacific ring of fire. >> it's one of nature's most incredible events when the coral that makes up the great barrier reef has coral spawning. >> it's on a amazing site, like a storm, but backwards, going up. it's really weird. it's awesome. >> scientists say the temperature and slow tical flow made conditions ideal this year. >> outside vancouver, a plant is turning com post into electricity for 900 homes. it's one of the first in north america set up for a large scale power generation and is considered a model for the
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future. >> as com posting facilities go, this one even on a 90-degree day is remarkably odor free. that's because the foulest smelling food waste is mostly enclosed in an oxygen free chamber. >> we're at the beginning of building a business opportunity here where we can save people money, produce renewable energy and produce high quality soil products and all done in a way that is cost effective and good for the environment. >> the technology is european. it's an industrial process that essentially mimics on a large scale what happens inside a cow's stomach. it starts by seeding the digestor with material from the cow's other end. over the next 14 days, bacteria produce methane bio gas, which is burned to generate electricity. >> this facile will process 200,000 tons of organic matter
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each year, each ton capable of producing 300-kilowatt hours of electricity and com post. >> that's enough a power an average momentum for more than a week. >> it's very exciting, very exciting to be with a company that's on the cutting edge, of waste management. >> why here? metro vancouver aims to be the greenest city in the world within the decade. it's begun requiring home openers to separate food waste from garbage. the community pace the oh company to haul off the food waste, the company sells com post to whoever wants it, like gardeners. >> it's healthy for the plants, they like it. i think it's a win-win situation all the way around. keeps the stuff out of landfill. >> in the u.s., it is estimated almost half of all municipal solid waste is organic and most of that is food. it's a business opportunity for
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companies like harvest power and a boon to communities. harvest power said turning food waste into power or potting soil is cheaper, cleaner and greener than just dumping it. >> harvest power also com perfects food and plant waste. they sell 29 million bags of soil, mulch and fertilizer products every year. >> a mother in shanghai is bringing home a big bundle of joy. at 13.6 pounds, the baby is one of the biggest ever born in china. the mother spent much of the pregnancy in bed. >> here's a look at what we're following this morning. a large storm system blamed for eight deaths is heading east. it's affecting roads and flights on one of the we seest travel times of the year. >> the israeli prime minister islaming the iranian deal.
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>> the 11,000 people in syria have died in the civil war during the last three years. a report finds some children were tortured and executed. >> cam newton might be superman and his team might be super, too, highlights of another carolina comeback later in sports. >> strengthening storm system is creating trouble on the roads and will cause major thanks giving travel delays. i'll have that forecast. >> the aljazeera morning news continues. del walters is back with you in two and a half minutes. you're looking live at the new york city skyline. we'll be right back.
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>> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> a large and deadly storm system moving across the u.s. dangerous travel conditions could threaten your halladay travel plants. >> iran's nuclear deal, the road blocks that threaten this agreement. >> as fighting continues in syria's civil war, a new report tells us how children are targeted by all the violence. >> servicemen starting their own business to help servicemen and women.
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>> a massive storm system is making its way across the country, it has already been blamed for at least eight deaths and now is headed east. good morning and welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. thunderstorms are freezing rain and heavy snow hammering much of the southwest, now headed for the east coast just as millions get ready to take to the roads for thanks giving. more than 300 flights in and out of dallas were canceled sunday. icy roads linked to the death of a 4-year-old girl in no mexico, the car she was riding in jumped across the traffic lanes and flipped on to the shoulder. she was not wearing her seatbelt. we have more on this deadly storm. >> icy temples, freezing rains, flash floods and heavy snow, the deadly storm is not letting up after slamming the southwest, moving into the midwest and now barreling for the northeast. the wintery conditions caused hundreds of spinouts, rollovers
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and pile ups. those car crashes are blamed for eight killed in the storm's path. in california, a body was found near downed power lines and a woman killed when a tree fell on her parked car. ice halted highways in ta texasd oklahoma. >> it's hard to keep control of your car especially under bridges. >> wildfires in california were whipped as heavy snow was dumped in texas. >> arizona got hit with snow and sleet, too. >> we definitely need it. it's good. we've been so dry. >> nearly four feet of snow fell on the four corners area. some areas are not used to this could you have weather at all. >> i don't know what this stuff is. >> it's all white!
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look at this stuff. >> the storm slammed away sunday pushing through texas. outside of dallas, a tour bus carrying willie nelson's band pit a pillar on the highway. nelson was not onboard, but three band members were hurt. to avoid dozens on the runways and keep flights flowing, workers at dallas/fort worth international airport spent the day deicing planes. already, more than 300 flights have been canceled, making for long lines and a lot of waiting. >> it's not looking good for holiday travelers across the northeast. the storm is set to hit washington, philadelphia, new york city and boston on wednesday, the day before thanksgiving. triple ax exspent 40 million people to be on the road this week. >> that storm is on the move. nicole mitchell with a look at where the system is headed. >> it's already causing problems
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this morning. arkansas you can see most of this is under the pink, showing where we have the freezing precipitation this morning. little rock, you are getting freezing rain right now. be very careful ole the roads. the southern side of this is still rain. a little more warm air as this moves on. we have winter weather advisories up, even winter storm warnings because we have the treacherous roads, some areas getting snow. this converts a little more to rain later in the day and then as it moves off, by the tomorrow, texas still dealing with wet weather will be clear. this moisture spreads on tuesday across the southern portion of the country and then up the east coast. that's because that's where the low pressure is moving tuesday more to the south, wednesday up the east coast. the delays will be going right along with the system, so watch for more.
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we saw flight cancellations. we could see more of that over the next couple of days as this causes those impact. things will remain cold with this. that's going to be another problem if you're out there. on the backside, some of that will switch to snow pap lot of this is going to be a heavy rain, as it goes to the south, we're looking at one to three inches persistently. if you're not flying and instead driving, you're going to be dealing with that. we have the cold temperatures approximately i'll have more on not only the chilly temperatures, but the wind chills coming up. >> a 30 year chill in relations between the u.s. and iran, a deal is called for iran to slow its nuclear program. it's an interim deal until a stronger, more lasting agreement is put together. >> secretary of state john kerry says the six momentum agreement buys time, time to hammer out a
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more comprehensive deal, one that aim to say roll back iran's nuclear program, not just halt it. >> now the really hard part begins, and that is the effort to get the comprehensive agreement, which will require enormous steps in terms of verify caution, transparency and accountability. we know this. we will work together. we will start today literally to continue the efforts out of geneva and to press forward. >> secretary kerry, a long time u.s. is not veteran anticipated pushback from lawmakers, who are still weighing their own legislation to increase sanctions against iran. >> i would caution the president from overselling this deal, because it is not a full dismantling of their program, and that would be a historical deal. when you have friends and allies inside the region strongly opposed to it, i would caution it. >> house speaker john boehner
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said this deal is being met with healthy skepticism and hard questions, saying both the white house and congress want a final deal that bars ai ran from ever creating a nuclear weapon, but for now "the lingering question is whether the negotiating partner will work equally hard to preserve the strong international sanctions regime until that goal is achieved." our policy i also that iran should not have a nuclear arms capability. that continues to be our policy, and the military option as secretary kerry just said is till on the table and it needs to be on the table. we need to make sure iran does not move forward. i think this is a marginal improvement. >> a freeze isn't enough for two top senate departments saying they expect the senate to move forward on sanctions next month despite pleas from the white
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house to give the new deal time to ripen. >> mixed reaction on capitol hill, seems this time to be bipartisan. what is the white house saying? >> mixed reaction, as you said. there is some praise, senator dianne feinstein saying this is a giant step forward, representative nancy pelosi calling it an essential step forward, but a lot of criticism from both sides of the aisle. congress, many members feeling they need to keep up the pressure on iran to make sure that a final deal is worked out and to make sure iran sticks to this interim agreement. the question is on timing. if new sanctions are put in, when would that be. a number of key lawmakers on the republican and democratic side do seem to be saying we are going to pass new sanctions, but maybe we'll give the white house and other negotiators a chance to see if they'll come up with a
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final deal. chuck schumer of new york calling this a great deal for iran does not feel that way, saying in fact that this deal makes it more likely that republicans and democrats are going to come together and pass new sanctions so the white house has a lot of work on capitol hill to tamp that down. >> the white house seems to be taking a page from ronald reagan's old playbook, trust but verify. >> absolutely. the secretary of state has said we're going into this with our eyes wide open and the white house has indicated that it's going to be watching closely as will congress to see that iran sticks to this interim agreement and see that is iran really will follow through ultimately on an agreement that will make it much less likely, if not impossible for them to develop a nuclear weapon. president obama has indicated that if iran doesn't keep up its side of the bargain, that they can ratchet up the pressure
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very, very quickly. del. >> lisa, thank you very much. >> many iranians happy about the deal, saying they hope it helps the country emerge from years of economic isolation. crowds took to the streets of iran after hearing the news. >> many in tehran stayed up all night, thousands making their way to the airport, giving a hero'sble come to the prime minister, hailing him as an ambassador for peace. vile's prime minister saying the deal will make the world a more dangerous place. president obama telephoned netanyahu. but netanyahu calling the deal a historic mistake. for more, we are joined from jerusalem now. world leadiers describing this as a breakthrough, but some say
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it is not that, including israel. who's right, who's wrong? >> at the end of the day, the relationship will survive and two sides agree to disagree. there's a huge amount of tension right now. there's an ideological difference here. the u.s. has signed a deal that freezes the iranian program, not dismantling it. israel says that there's no deal allowed unless iran has no capacity to build a nuclear weapon or it would take them a matter of years. the two sides are far apart that that. whether or not the tension continues will be up to weather the long-term deal is straightened out in about six months, with weather that deal says iran doesn't have the capacity to create nuclear weapons and cannot enrich, then
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you'll see israel saying this is a good deal. anything short of that, netten yuha will continue his criticism. >> netten yuha saying israeli is ready to defend itself. take a listen to what he had to say. >> israel has many friends and allies, but when they're mistaken, it's my obligation to speak out clearly and openly and say so. it's my solemn responsibility to protect and defend the one and only. >> inbound state. >> nick, in light of the deal, does iran still pose a threat to israel? >> i think netanyahu would say yes, it does, long arguing that iran poses a threat to israeli. he see's himself the custodian to the people.
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iran has said in the past that it has the desire to exterminate the jewish state, it supports militant groups on israeli borders and has the capacity to launch missiles into israel. iran has said it has no desire to do so, but for netten. >> who, this is a personal thank you. he sees the west making a historic mistake akin to prime minister chamberlain before world war ii, chamberlain made a deal with hitler. netten. >> who sees himself as a person opposing that type of deal. this rhetoric will increase until the long-term deem is made. if he sees that deal truly taking away iran's capacity to create a nuclear weapon, then his rhetoric will reduce. if not, he'll keep on going. >> there is a developing story coming out this morning, a conference between the syrian
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government and opposition forces is going to start on january 22 in geneva. in syria, at least 160 people were killed in the latest round of fighting there. rebels are trying to break through a blockade near damascus. aid workers say they think asses forces are trying to starve residents to death. >> what do we know about the framework for this conference? >> well, apart from the statement, we know very little about the actual framework, who we at least have a date, wednesday, january 22. we've been waiting a long while for that to be fixed. many, many problems ahead, but the u.n. secretary said this is a mission of hope, saying it must set up a transitional
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government with full executive powers over the military and security forces. he did say that the people involved, the parties involved, and we still don't know the full list of those involved yet, should show vision and leadership to make sure this peace conference actually gets and achieves something. he said it would be simply unforgivable not to seize this opportunity to end the war that's dragged on for too long and caused such utter destruction and suffering. despite those words, those brave words, it does appear that there are so many political obstacles still to the peace conference and those have not been solved but at least the date does concentrate the minds. already we've heard from some of the opposition forces fighting the regime that they will not attended and the government themselves have said that they shouldn't think that they're going to be handing the keys of damascus to the opposition
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forces when they come to the peace negotiations here in geneva. also the problem about which countries will attend, now will iran attend? will saudi arabia attend? both have deep stakes in the conflicts at the moment. we're hearing they think iran and saudi arabia will attend as observers, not be at the actual table. >> steps toward peace in syria can't come soon enough for those affected by the long and bloody civil war. the fighting there now taking a heavy toll on the nation's children. we have more. >> it's 1:00 on wednesday afternoon in a district of damascus. one of the local activists is asking a group of children what it's like living here. >> when we were at school, piles of dead bodies were brought in
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every day. we used to see them prepared for burial. >> as they continue to tell their story, this happened. [ explosion ] >> go, go, go. >> a shell hits the area. it's a snapshot of what it's like on the ground. while political bickering has the luxury of time, many living here do not. the united nations said nearly half of syrians are dependent on foreign aid to survive. that's 9.3 million people. six and a half million of those are displaced while over 2 million have fled syria, many now living in refugee camps in neighboring countries. 100,000 people have been killed. 11,000 of those are children. today, these children survived. aljazeera managed to track them
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down in the syrian capitol. >> we were riding our bikes when we saw the activist. he said i want to film you. the shell landed. we didn't get hurt. my mother started crying. >> my mother also cried. >> many have asked the question if political pressure paves the way for a safe visit by the chemical weapons inspectors here, then why can't the same be done for the humanitarian medical aid the people desperately need? >> the u.n. calls syria the worst humanitarian crisis since rwanda in 1994. >> in libya, nine solen are dead. at least 47 others were wounded. gunfire breaking out today in ben gassy outside a check point run by a group suspected in the attack on the u.s. consulate that left four dead. >> some applauding that nuclear deal with ai ran, but israel's
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leader said it's a historic mistake. >> one third of the children in the central african republic are attending schools. the battle he had cadeors face. >> veterans trying to start businesses when they come back home and how overcoming those hurdles is helping other vets and the economy.
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power of the people until we restore our free
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. up next, we'll tell you what that nuclear deal with iran means for israeli's position in the middle east. first, we check in with nicole mitchell. >> it's definitely chilly. this morning, we already have temperatures in the 30's, but some of temperatures around the midwest, once we add in the winds gusting in the 20's and
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30-mile per hour range, chick which is 26 feels like nine if you have any exposed skin out there, so you certainly want the layers. into the northeast, we had the temperatures fall yet and brutally cold with the wind chill, this morning still in the teens and 20's and southward arkansas into texas, temperatures freezing. little rock has freezing-run. we'll show you more of that coming up. >> for the first time in a decade, iran agreed to limit its nuclear activities in a deal worked out in geneva. some tough economic sanctions against iran will be lifted. iran has agreed to stop enriching uranium beyond 5% and disarm its current you stockpile above that point. they've agreed to give greater access to inspectors, including to two nuclear sites. the deal calls for protone yum development to be halted at
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another plant which mean feared would be used to make nuclear weapons. israeli leaders dough announcing the pact, calling it a historic mistake, claiming it does little to reverse iran's nuclear ambitions and makes the world a more dangerous place. we are are joint now to discuss this. the israeli's say it makes the world less safe. who's right? >> i think certainly secretary kerry feels that way because from his perspective, it does delay iran's effort to continue to make progress in its nuclear program. on the other hand, from naughton yahoo's perspective, the deal is dangerous. i think the united states might not have considered carefully the psychological damage for
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this particular program as far as iran goes, because historical security is very, very serious and they say iran has always presented a threat to israel and no prime minister would take such a threat lightly. >> even as we speak, we are learning that prime minister netanyahu is sending his national security advisor to washington to talk to the white house. is this a sign there may be serious damage to relations? >> i think there is a damage, however, israeli does no the really have much choice but to continue it's dialogue with the beyond. i think it is essential that president obama and prime minister netanyahu sit down and begin to work much closer. that for example, the fact that the united conduct the secret
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negotiations for the last six months and tell israel only suction months ago raises serious doubt what the united states is sharing what it knows about iran. we need to mend the relationship by requiring considerably closer coordination and cooperation. israel needs to be assured that future negotiation with iran, that israel is fully aware exactly what has taken place. >> it almost seems there needs to be solomon's wisdom here. in one sense, you have israel concerned about its security, you have clear proof that the sanctions were working against the people of iran, not perhaps the leadership, but the people were suffering. how do you strike a deal that keeps one group of people safe and another group safe without angering the leaders on both sides? >> the iranian people might
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be -- but for israel, it is a martyr of existence itself. it would like to have peace with its arab neighbors but under certain conditions. as long as iran continues to have a nuclear program and the right now, which has been enshrined by this interim deal to enrich you're 18 yes, ma'am, israel will never feel comfortable as long as iran maintains its animosity and threat toward the state of israel. >> thank you for being with us this morning. >> some u.s. lawmakers also aren't sold on that u.s. iranian nuclear deal, questions now whether iran will live up to the agreement. some of ready to impose tougher sanctions if iran does not carry
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through. >> business news this morning, a holiday shortened trading week, stock futures at this hour higher signaling a positive stuart trading. do you jones opening at 16,064, theuropean markets are higher in early trading. in asia, the markets are closing mixed. >> the iranian deal driving down oil prices, crude down $1.32. gas prices at the pump of going up after falling for nine weeks. the cost per gallon now up 3 cents. the nationwide average is $3.25.
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>> new numbers suggest people are having a hard time coping with the weakened economy. american's main priority right now is staying on top of their bulls, paying down debt. the situation has barely changed since last year. >> people are unemployed or working on a reduced income. even if they are working, their incomes haven't gone up. a lot of that really makes it difficult for people to feel like they're making financial headway. >> only one third of americans people they are financially secure. >> a battle for power in bangkok. thawhat's behind this, one of thailand's largest demonstrations in years. >> in the philippines, trying to survive after losing everything. >> children in the central
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african republic, making education a struggle. what educators face every day. >> manning versus brady makes for one marquee matchup. highlights coming up in sports. from us. >> so join the conversation and make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it
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doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare...
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ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> welcome back, these are our top stories. that at least eight are dead after a wintery storm moved through the southwest. as the storm heads east, it could severely hamper road and air travel during thanksgiving. >> a diplomatic break through, representatives from syria's government and opposition groups agreeing to meet early next year. thousands of syrian children
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have already been targeted by snipers and tortured everyone that country's civil war. >> there is mixed reaction to that iranian nuclear deal. the countries foreign minister has been hailed as an ambassador for peace. israeli leaders slam the agreement and some members in congress want sanctions stepped up. >> the u.s. is pressuring the president of afghanistan to sign that security agreement before year's end, a deal that would keep u.s. troops there after 2014 was fraud by an assembly of afghan elders. they are urging president karzai to sign the deal. he says he needs more time to get a better teal from washington. >> i want to repeat again, americans cannot go into our houses after the bilateral documents. they cannot kill anyone in their house. the afghan people will be safe and peace will come. it will not be a case of americans sitting in their bases and then we have a war in their country. i don't accept that. this decision is historical.
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>> we are just receiving reports that national security advisor susan rice is in afghanistan and will meet with the afghan president. >> clashes in thailand with demonstrators and police. thousands turning out for a second day of anti-government protest in bangkok. that protestors have entered the compound of the foreign minister, demanding the resignation of the countries leader. they say they want to stop what they call continued influence from its deposed minister. the rally is the largest in five years. >> hundreds of protestors clashed with police in ukraine today angry about the government's sudden decision to shift allegiance from the west to russia. tens of thousands demonstrated after an agreement with the european union was dropped three that that protest was the nation's largest since the orange revolution nine years ago. european officials say russia threatened to impose trade
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sanctions if the deal with the e.u. was signed. >> for millions of children in the central african re public, a decent education i guess the only chance to escape poverty. schools have been impacted by violence he is claying. pure than a third of the countries children go to school. >> this is one of the few schools to open in this remote region north of the capitol. these children have seen violence and their families don't have enough to eat. there is very little teaching going on here right now. the best staff can do is try to make the children feel safe. >> everything is gone. everything's been tollen. the desks for the students, the teachers and directors, it's all been looted. we have no vehicles, there's nothing left. we make due with what we have.
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we meet under our trees and our offices are in the streets. >> there aren't enough classrooms for teachers. some staff are too scared to leave their homes and walk here. these kids are racing to go into the classrooms, but their teacher hasn't come to work today. there aren't enough teachers in the country, and more than half of staff in schools do not have the right qualifications. conflict has made things worse. education has been deprived for years. only some con afford notebooks and pens. the others rely on chalk and slate, which they wipe clean at the end of the day. the world bank is planning to send books here next year, but at the moment, there are few textbooks, so children end up failing exams. >> we know that one educated person is taking care of their
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own health. think about development to work on projects and get financing. that's not the case in central african republic at the moment. >> the teacher asks his pupils what is peace. they answer peace is when there's no war. these children are bright and engaged, but they have to catch up on almost a year of schooling. in one of the poorest nations in the world, the only hope people has of improving their lives is an education, and right now, they're not getting one. >> a meeting of the u.n. security council today is expected to address that crisis in the central african republic. the president of latvia call this deadly building collapse in the nation's capitol murder. 54 people have died since the roof of a busy prosecutor market caved in thursday. officials say soil and materials for a garden being built on the
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roof may have caused the collapse. it is the nation's deadliest disaster since the soviet republic gained independence in 1991. >> 5,000 people are known to have died in the philippines already after the typhoon struck two weeks ago. may not have been left homeless and rely on government aid. we have more. >> it's been two weeks sings this family had a proper meal. they are hungry. they have lost their home, belongings and livelihood. he doesn't know how he'll feed his family. >> it hurts for a father to see his churn go hungry. i have no food to give them. i don't know where to go. i hope there are kind hearts who can help us, because everything we have worked for here is gone. >> the typhoon struck this region, destroying everything in its bag, wiping out coastal
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village and displacing millions of people. at least 5,000 people have been killed, and the number keeps rising. >> the devastation is staggering. although the death toll here is relatively low compared to others in central philippines, 95% of the crops have been destroyed. that is a big blow to a town that is entirely dependent on agriculture. >> this is where antonio used to work. haiyan destroyed this farm. that industry is now wiped out. sugar contain farmers work here for months. it is harvest season, but, they are left with nothing. vegetables were not spared. everything was destroyed. >> this is very difficult for my town. how can they recover? where do they start? this is a long-term problem. >> central philippines has long been battered by natural
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disasters, but this one is unprecedented. government resources are stretched, having to provide for the basic needs of the millions of people who have been displaced. there is nothing left here now, and people here would like to start all over again. somewhere with a future, they say, but they do not even know where to go. >> aljazeera in central philippines. >> a risk assessment firm estimates the storm could cost the economy $14 billion. >> two candidates claim to have the the upper hand after the presidential election in honduras. more than half the ballots have been counted. the ruling national party candidate said he is ahead, but his rival is declaring victory. >> according to the exit polls we've received from the entire country, and also the count of information and ballots that we've received today, we can
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clearly tell you that i am the president of ha honduras. >> the wife of the former president was forced from office four years ago. >> nearly a year after the tragedy at sandy hook elementary, new details are set to be released. the findings from the investigation are being reds. they are holding back the 911 calls and full police report. a gunman killed 20 children and six teachers at that school. >> when it comes to the housing market, current conditions suggest two different receipts, how your earnings compare to your mortgage costs and where you live. joining us now to help us make sense of the conditions, we are joined by tim rue. he is joined from washington this morning. >> delinquencies are high as
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shown by the yellow line on the chart. tell us what's going on. >> housing is a misnomer to think that there is a housing market. housing is local. there will be pockets of growth, pockets of depreciation and a status quo, where you won't see too much growth. the housing has fallen roughly 40% off the peak in 2006. it is working its way back up. we have recovered 20% since the peak. some markets of up 35%, 40%, others up 10% or 12%. you still have ruffle 10 million, 11 million people that are underwater, they have no equity, or less than 20% equity. that has been helping the housing market recover, because these people can't sell. >> we hear about the markets that are recovering, washington,
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new york, atlanta, but where are they really still bad? >> the rust belt for sure is still having a tough time recovering. it's on a relative basis, though, because all of the markets that you've seen the biggest increase are the ones that really participated in the housing boom. when you look at areas like detroit, they are still off 50% from their highs. this is the vexing problem, they didn't get the benefit of the run up of the housing market, never had that appreciation. those surrounding yours are still pretty tragically affected by the crisis. >> the opposite side of the story, those improving sales of existing homes. >> housing is seasonal. it tapers off through the fall and winter months.
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over the last two years has been a miraclous recovery. last year, we saw about a 13% year over year appreciation rate. the arc is still pretty impressive, but flattening out for a lot of good reasons. you just can't have and don't want to sustain that sort of recovery at that pace. what you're going to find is over the next four years, we expect that that rate of appreciation will cap out somewhere around 24%, slightly above average, appreciation rates on a yearly basis. >> home prices nation wild are going up. good news if you're trying to sell, bad news if you're trying to buy. who faces the most pressures? >> nobody likes to sell at the bottom. everybody likes to buy at the bottom. right now, you're seeing that the homebuyers, we had this whole mix up where we've reorganized who's been buying properties over the last two years. historically home buying has been done 40% of the time by first time homebuyers. well, for a are a invite of good
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reasons, unemployment rates, consumer confidence, you name it, the first time home buyer has really pulled back and are not in the market nearly what they used to be. they're being replaced by more speculative buyer. that this is the thing that starts to scratch your head, when you start seeing institution alimony coming into the marketplace, replacing the first time home buyer, competing with the first time home buyer. they've had a benefit buying these real estate properties, fixing them up and renting them out. they've seen a tremendous boom in terms of their returns. >> are most of the people buying houses out there jane and john doe or are they those institutional buyers that you talk about? >> unfortunately, there's fewer john and jane does out there. that gets to a bigger issue, which is despite the story, the cautioning tale about housing,
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if we're creating too many barriers to get to into a home, we risk their long term prosperity. the government at some point in time is going to have to be responsible for their health care, that he retirement and such. >> john henry smith is here with sports, a big matchup in sunday night football. interesting ending. >> tom brady and peyton manning are in their late 30s, neither a spring chicken. sunday night's matchup was one to savor, could be one of the last times we see them go head-to-head. 14th meeting between these
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two. touchdown, patriots down three in the fourth. in for the touchdown, nine catches and scored twice, patriots take the lead. new england up 31-24. manning with the game on the line hits thomas, sending it into o.t. wes welker at the last second tells his teammates to get away from the ball. they don't hear him. the field goal gives the patriots the win. afterwards, the question had to be asked how did the patriots get it done in the second half? we will shape sound and go on to the next. south beach, 53 yards, dolphins jump in 16-3 on carolina. cam newton and the panthers
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rally back. newton takes it in to cap a 43-yard drive. the panthers win for their seventh straight win. >> i think the resolve is there most certainly. we're not always the smartest bunch out there, because we do some silly things, but these guys came out in the second half, they're very resilient, the offensive line came together and pulled it together and did some really nice things fours, gave us time. we were able to run the ball effectively when we had to and gave ourselves a chance to win. >> high stakes matchup in new jersey, the giants hosting the cowboys, both teams trying to keep patient with the eagles. that cruz gets mauled and ball
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pops loose. dallas a 7-0 lead. romo had 199 career touchdown passes, third quarter gets number be 200. dallas in control, up 21-6. the g. men would rally, manning in the pocket buying time. the two-point conversion to yous i up. romo gets criticized for not playing well with the game on the line but was clutch, connecting on two critical third down throws. that one led to dan bailey kicking from 35 yards out for the win. that is your ballgame. cowboys are now tied with the eagles in first at 6-5. >> louisville rolled into sunday as the defending national champs with a 21 game win streak. the good times would not keep rolling. number 24 north carolina coming off an upset loss to belmont last week pulled off an upset of
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their own against the number three team in the country. a career high 32 founts for paige. the cardinals handed their first loss of the season. that's your look at sports this morning. >> from the battlefield to the boardroom, some vets are using military skills to succeed in business. >> volcanic activity forcing thousands in indonesia to flee. >> snow and ice creating difficult driving conditions. i'll tell you what the rest of the forecast holds.
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>> and now, a techknow minute...
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. that i'm del walters. just ahead, we'll tell you about some vets using their military skills to start small businesses at home and how they are now paying it forward to other men and women in uniform. first, let's find on you if it's going to rain or snow where you are and check in with nicole mitchell. >> before we get to everything else. i want to give the silver lining, most of the western portion of the country is going
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to do pretty nicely the next couple of days. if you're in that direction, be thankful. here's what the rest of it looks like, heavy snow in wisconsin to treeing precipitation into arkansas and texas this morning. here's the heavy stuff, wisconsin now spreading a little more into mitch again, but that's really going to make the roads difficult. then, look at the last couple frails of this, a lot of arkansas dealing with freezing precipitation, including little rock this morning. many roads are reporting at least patches of ice. be careful with that. you can see the southern edge is rain, as its gets warmer, a lot of this is rain. chance for thunderstorms in the south, but heavy rain is going to be a big problem. this goes the next 24 hours, so into the day tomorrow, that spreads up the east coast. this is going to cause big problems with people trying to get out the door on some of those holiday flights. del. >> an iceberg about the size of manhattan is floating away from
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antarctica. called b31, satellite images showed it break away early this month. it is wing monitored to see if it will disrupt shipping lanes. >> people in indonesia are leaving the area of an active volcano. an message radio letter is at its highest level and evacuations are ordered. it is one of 130 active volcanos in the ring of fire. >> thousands of stress coming back home are looking for work. skills on the battlefield don't always apply pack home. some are taking advantage of low cost small business loans to start businesses. >> with days left before the start of the holiday season, employees are in high gear, melting, decorating and packing of goodies to senden to customers across the country.
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>> i worked since i'm probably four years old, my entire life and i have chocolate in my veins. >> he took over the business from his father. both are veterans. >> i was in the second armored calendar vary in germany. >> joe was the first to attend west point from his family. he spent two years in iraq during some of the bloodiest days of fighting. he knew he wanted to take over the family business. >> it costs about $300,000 to open up your own chocolate store with all the inventory and liability insurances and the machinery, and getting everything up and going. a lot of vets don't have that saved. >> the major found a program called vet loan advantage, sponsored by the small business administration and a d.c. based trade group. it offers commercial real estate loans with long-term low interest rates, rates that most
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commercial banks captain compete with. in 2013, more than 7,000 loans worth more than $.8 billion were given. he connects vets to the capitol they need. >> leadership, understanding changing situations quickly are skulls learned in the military and lead to success with a small business owner. >> the low interest loans provide the working capitol he says he couldn't have gotten at a bank. >> this machine is the machine that the $50,000 loan i got for
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being a veteran. >> vets tend to hire vets, adding much-needed jobs to the economy. with their $850,000 loan, chocolate works has expanded to three retail stores with more than 23 employees. since june, they've sold 23 franchises. he plans to take another loan to keep expanding. that's what i call some pretty sweet success. aljazeera, new york. >> the white house saying that slightly more than half of the 66,000 american troops are coming back from afghanistan in february, and going back into the workforce. >> a comet is heading for a close call with the sun. if it's not vaporized, it could be visible to the naked eye, passing near the sun thursday. if it survives the heat and sun's gravitational field, it could put on quite a light show in december. it should be visible in the mornings next month and at night
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starting in january. >> finally this morning, oh, baby, a mother in shanghai bringing home a very big bundle of joy, at 13-point suction pounds. this baby is one of the biggest ever born in china, anywhere for that matter. the mother spent much of her pregnancy in bed. she did eat just a little bit too much during her pregnancy. that's going to do it for this hour of aljazeera america. there is more news straight ahead in two and a half minutes. check us out 24 hours a day at aljazeera.com. in the northeast, it's going to be really cold, so bundle up.
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>> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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